“The Widow” by Fiona Barton

The Widow by Fiona BartonI have had it up to here with thrillers featuring unreliable narrators and crazy plot twists. I was fully prepared to swear off such books for a while, but my friend Vallery recommended I read Fiona Barton’s The Widow, and I’m very glad I did. This is a first-rate work of psychological suspense.

The novel moves back and forth in time, beginning in 2010, shortly after Jean Taylor became a widow. Her husband Glen was run over by a bus. Just a tragic accident. So why is Jean being relentlessly pursued by the press?

Through flashbacks, we gradually learn that Glen was the chief suspect in the disappearance of Bella Elliott, an adorable toddler who vanished without a trace from her garden while her single mom was briefly busy indoors. Bella becomes a national obsession in Britain—and if you think the attention paid to her case is too over-the-top, I urge you to Google Madeleine McCann—and eventually, Glen is put on trial for abducting her, despite the fact that no body was ever found. He and Jean become pariahs, and making things even more difficult for Jean is the fact that the couple was unable to have children of their own.

I don’t want to give away too much, but The Widow is a refreshingly straightforward combination of psychological suspense and good old-fashioned police procedural, as we get to know the detectives working on the case (and how it becomes an all-out fixation for one of them). It’s also an indictment of journalism as practiced in the U.K., which is all the more interesting considering that Fiona Barton worked for the Daily Mail, Daily Telegraph and Mail on Sunday. Reporters in the U.S. can be aggressive, but there seems to be a special breed of newsmen and women in England who will stop at nothing to get an exclusive. As The Widow proves, however, sometimes the subject of a story can bite back and use the press to her own advantage. In Jean, Barton has created a complex and fascinating character.

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