“One Day in December” by Josie Silver

One Day in DecemberBefore I started reading One Day in December, I scanned the blurbs on the back cover, including this one by author Hannah Orenstein: “I devoured this delicious novel in one sitting.” Noting that One Day in December is 400 pages long, I scoffed at the idea of reading it in one go, assuming I would finish it in 3-4 days.

Instead, I found myself turning the final page at about 1:45 AM, long past my usual bedtime, grateful that I’d at least started it on a weekend night.

The novel covers 10 years in the life of a Londoner named Laurie, beginning on a fateful December day in 2008. Laurie is riding the bus and looking out the window when she spots the man of her dreams waiting at a stop. Their eyes meet, “as if an invisible fork of lightning has inexplicably joined us together.” But he’s waiting for a different bus, and Laurie is hemmed in by a crowd of passengers, so she can only sit there helplessly as the bus pulls away.

At this point, I wondered if they have “Missed Connections” ads in London, but I guess not, since Laurie spends months searching for “Bus Boy,” to no avail. Helping her out is her best friend and roomie Sarah, a gorgeous aspiring TV presenter. Sadly, a year passes, and Laurie never manages to find her mystery man. Then Sarah introduces her new boyfriend to Laurie and… you definitely see where this is going, right?

The premise is pure rom-com, but Silver kept me turning the pages because the characters were so appealing: you get to see them grow from kids fresh out of university into adulthood, making mistakes and figuring things out along the way. When Laurie realizes that her pal’s new love, Jack, is Bus Boy, she immediately decides not to tell Sarah that he is the guy she’s been mooning over all year long. Jack doesn’t say anything, either (Laurie can’t be sure that he even recognizes her).

The main reason Laurie doesn’t want to spill the beans to Sarah is because she doesn’t want to risk jeopardizing her friend’s happiness. The relationship between the two women is, refreshingly, depicted as just as important, if not more important, than any of the romantic entanglements in the book. Laurie’s family is also a crucial part of her world. By the end, Laurie, Jack and Sarah all felt like old friends.

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