“One Day in December” by Josie Silver

One Day in DecemberBefore I started reading One Day in December, I scanned the blurbs on the back cover, including this one by author Hannah Orenstein: “I devoured this delicious novel in one sitting.” Noting that One Day in December is 400 pages long, I scoffed at the idea of reading it in one go, assuming I would finish it in 3-4 days.

Instead, I found myself turning the final page at about 1:45 AM, long past my usual bedtime, grateful that I’d at least started it on a weekend night.

The novel covers 10 years in the life of a Londoner named Laurie, beginning on a fateful December day in 2008. Laurie is riding the bus and looking out the window when she spots the man of her dreams waiting at a stop. Their eyes meet, “as if an invisible fork of lightning has inexplicably joined us together.” But he’s waiting for a different bus, and Laurie is hemmed in by a crowd of passengers, so she can only sit there helplessly as the bus pulls away.

At this point, I wondered if they have “Missed Connections” ads in London, but I guess not, since Laurie spends months searching for “Bus Boy,” to no avail. Helping her out is her best friend and roomie Sarah, a gorgeous aspiring TV presenter. Sadly, a year passes, and Laurie never manages to find her mystery man. Then Sarah introduces her new boyfriend to Laurie and… you definitely see where this is going, right?

The premise is pure rom-com, but Silver kept me turning the pages because the characters were so appealing: you get to see them grow from kids fresh out of university into adulthood, making mistakes and figuring things out along the way. When Laurie realizes that her pal’s new love, Jack, is Bus Boy, she immediately decides not to tell Sarah that he is the guy she’s been mooning over all year long. Jack doesn’t say anything, either (Laurie can’t be sure that he even recognizes her).

The main reason Laurie doesn’t want to spill the beans to Sarah is because she doesn’t want to risk jeopardizing her friend’s happiness. The relationship between the two women is, refreshingly, depicted as just as important, if not more important, than any of the romantic entanglements in the book. Laurie’s family is also a crucial part of her world. By the end, Laurie, Jack and Sarah all felt like old friends.

“Your Second Life Begins When You Realize You Only Have One” by Raphaëlle Giordano

Your Second Life Begins When You Realize You Only Have OneIt’s the beginning of a new year, which means many people will be picking up self-help books. I was curious about Your Second Life Begins When You Realize You Only Have One because it is, as far as I know, the only book of its kind: self-help fiction. YSLB tells the story of a Parisian woman named Camille who changes her life with the help of Claude, a “routinologist.”

After they meet by chance, Claude describes the nature of his work to the harried, stressed-out Camille. “You’re probably suffering from a kind of acute routinitis,” he tells her. “The symptoms are almost always the same: a lack of motivation; chronic dissatisfaction; feeling you’ve lost your bearings and everything meaningful in life; finding it hard to feel happy even though you have more than enough material goods; disenchantment; world-weariness… Unfortunately, developing our capacity for being happy isn’t something we’re taught at school. Yet there are techniques you can learn.”

After mulling it over for a few days, Camille decides to call Claude and schedule an appointment, hoping to learn how to escape the rut of her long marriage and sometimes-fraught relationship with her 9-year-old son, and her exhausting job. The “routinologist” begins presenting her with tasks, from the straightforward (“throw away at least ten useless objects and… tidy up, sort out and refresh your surroundings”) to the fanciful (taking her on a long car ride to meet a great teacher who turns out to be… a cat: “There’s no one like him for being peaceful and calm, completely anchored in the here and now”). Over time, her life begins to change for the better in practically every way, including her love life with her husband Sebastien (“A warm wind blew on our love, reviving embers that seemed only too willing to burst into flame”).

My biggest beef with YSLB is that it’s just not very good as a novel. It’s full of anodyne aphorisms (“Today is a gift. That’s why it’s called the present” and “Come down from your cross, we need the wood”), and a lot of Claude’s advice seems torn from the pages of other self-help books, like suggesting she implement SMART goals—Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic and Timely. This made me curious to learn what SMART goals were called in the original French version. It turns out they’re… called SMART goals (Spécifique, Mesurable, Atteignable, Réaliste, Temps), which seems like a lucky break for the translator.

As someone who has often struggled with routinitis, I think the real benefit that Claude is selling is accountability. It’s easy to say you’re going to start doing things to break out of your rut, but wouldn’t you rather have a charming older Frenchman at your side to encourage you and take you on adventures? (The cat thing might have been a bit of an anticlimax, but he also arranges for Camille to go up in a hot-air balloon so she can toss overboard paper airplanes with negative thoughts written on them.)

YSLB has been a worldwide phenomenon, with millions of copies sold, so obviously a lot of people have found it inspirational. Personally, it made me think that a really great way to break out of my own routine would be to go to Paris and sit at a sidewalk café sipping an espresso while reading a more enjoyable novel than this one.

“Nine Perfect Strangers” by Liane Moriarty

Nine Perfect StrangersOne of the “nine perfect strangers” in Liane Moriarty’s new book happens to be a once-bestselling author whose career has fallen on hard times. Frances Welty’s latest book was rejected by her publisher, and perhaps even worse than that, a critic wrote a much-read opinion piece calling her novels “formulaic” and “trite.” Frances finds herself obsessing over it, which made me wonder if Moriarty was working out some of her own issues with negative reviews.

In any case, I found Nine Perfect Strangers to be anything but formulaic and trite, and it kept me awake an hour past my bedtime because I simply had to finish reading it. This is a very entertaining novel, although it’s one that goes off in some rather unexpected directions, so I’ll try to avoid spoiling too much of the plot.

Frances, along with eight other people—a newly-rich couple, an ex-athlete, a couple and their 20-year-old daughter, a woman whose husband has just left her, and a handsome lawyer—have all checked in to Tranquillum House for 10 days of wellness. The resort, in an isolated locale six hours northwest of Sydney, promises to transform its guests through “fasting, meditation, yoga, creative ’emotional-release exercises.”

“Like so many things in life, it had seemed like an excellent idea at the time,” muses Frances. What awaits her at Tranquillum House is a transformative experience, all right—but one that neither she nor any of her eight compatriots could ever have anticipated when they first drove through the gates. Rest and relaxation are definitely not on the menu.

The book has a lot of fun sending up the obsession with self-improvement, but it also tackles some very serious themes, and does so sensitively (as was also the case with Moriarty’s Big Little Lies, which dealt with domestic violence). Nine Perfect Strangers goes down as easily as a mango smoothie.

“The Red Address Book” by Sofia Lundberg

The Red Address BookWhen I was a child, I remember driving past the local cemetery with my grandmother and she’d often make a comment along the lines of, “I have so many friends in there.” At the time, it struck me as a terribly morbid thing to say, but now that I’m older and have lost some people who meant a great deal to me, I understand. My grandmother joined her friends a few years ago, so I can never tell her that I now know how she felt.

Doris, the protagonist of Sofia Lundberg’s The Red Address Book, is 96 years old, and was inspired by a real person: Lundberg’s great-aunt Doris, whose address book she discovered after her aunt had passed away. “She had crossed most of her friends’ names out and had written the word ‘dead’ next to them,” recalled Lundberg in an interview published on her book’s Amazon page. “It broke my heart to realize how lonely she must have felt. Her death was very painful for me, as we were so close. I couldn’t stop thinking about it.”

The fictional Doris is paging through the address book she received as a tenth-birthday gift. The crossed-out names inspire her to write down her recollections for her great-niece Jenny, who lives in California with her husband and three children, half a world away from Doris’ Stockholm apartment. Doris’ father died when she was a young girl, and at the age of 13, her mother sent her off to work as a servant in the home of a wealthy woman. After a year, her employer, Dominique, moves to Paris, bringing Doris along with her. But that is only the beginning of Doris’ adventures, which will eventually lead her back to Stockholm.

There was a lot in this book that hit me pretty hard—I am sure that The Red Address Book may strike many readers as too sentimental by half, but as for me, I was reading it in the waiting area of a Toyota dealership as my car was being worked on, and at one point I had to get up and go outside because I felt self-conscious about the tears in my eyes. It’s an international sensation, published in over 30 countries so far, and I can see why, as it deals with universal topics like life, love and loneliness. Doris’ life story kept me captivated from start to finish, and I suspect many American readers will embrace this book once it is published here next month.

The Red Address Book will be published on Jan. 8, 2019. Thanks to Houghton Mifflin Harcourt for the advance copy (via NetGalley).

“The Proposal” by Jasmine Guillory

The ProposalPublic proposals of marriage are everywhere lately. There was the contestant on “Jeopardy!” who popped the question to his girlfriend during the portion of the show usually reserved for anodyne chats with Alex Trebek. Director Glenn Weiss, immediately after winning an Emmy Award, looked down from the stage and asked his lady love to marry him. The boyfriend of a New York City marathoner couldn’t wait until she crossed the finish line, and he was criticized for breaking out the ring at Mile 16. Not even author events are safe; Tom Hanks, on tour to promote his book Uncommon Type, helped an audience member propose during the Q&A session. Who wouldn’t want the voice of Woody from “Toy Story” involved in their special moment?

“Luckily, she said yes,” People magazine noted about the Hanks-aided proposal. But what if she’d said no—and footage of the event, posted online by onlookers, had gone viral?

That’s the clever concept behind Jasmine Guillory’s The Proposal, the charming follow-up to her delightful debut, The Wedding Date. Nikole Patterson was not expecting her boyfriend of five months to ask for her hand in marriage during a Dodgers game, via a message on the Jumbotron. (The fact that he misspelled her name didn’t help.) Despite the cameras in her face, a flustered Nik knows she doesn’t want to accept the ring; she just wants to get away. A brother and sister sitting nearby help her escape the stadium, but there’s still enough video of Nik to make the “SportsCenter” highlights show. Suddenly, her Twitter mentions are blowing up, and not in a good way.

Nik’s relationship with the man who proposed is over, but she can’t stop thinking of the guy who helped her get away after the fiasco at the game. Carlos is a handsome, single doctor; Nik tracks him down and sends him a thank-you email. One thing leads to another, and before long, they’re enjoying a rebound relationship. But Nik, who is busy building her career as a freelance journalist, is adamant that she only wants some no-strings-attached fun. Is Carlos willing to accept her terms?

The Proposal has a lot of great supporting characters, including Nik’s best friends Dana and Courtney, and Carlos’s extended family; his cousin Jessie, pregnant with her first child, has been diagnosed with a condition that confines her to bed, and the rest of the clan is worried sick. After his father’s death, Carlos has taken on the role of patriarch and family problem-solver, something that isn’t always great for his own health and stress levels.

One way Carlos relaxes is by cooking, and there are a lot of descriptions of food in this book—don’t read it on an empty stomach! Nik’s pal Courtney owns a cupcake shop, too. The Proposal is the literary equivalent of a chilled glass of rosé (Nik’s favorite wine) and a chocolate cupcake with sprinkles: sweet and refreshing.

“November Road” by Lou Berney

November Road by Lou BerneyThe day John F. Kennedy was assassinated is frequently described as “the day America lost its innocence.” A decade later, Watergate represented the beginning of a new era, one in which many citizens grew deeply mistrustful about whether or not our leaders were telling us the truth. For someone like me, who grew up steeped in that post-Nixon cynicism, it’s hard to believe that after the Warren Commission report was issued, 87% of Americans were convinced that Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone. 20 years after JFK’s murder, that number was down to 11%.

Since it’s likely no one will ever know what really happened, the tragedy in Dallas is ripe for reinterpretation and myth-making. Enter Lou Berney, born the year after JFK’s assassination, who has skillfully spun his own yarn about who ordered the hit on the president: a fictional New Orleans mob boss named Carlos Marcello*. When one of Marcello’s lieutenants, Frank Guidry, hears the news about Kennedy, he immediately realizes he’s in trouble; after all, he just finished running an errand in Dallas for Carlos.

“Maybe it was just a coincidence, he told himself, that he’d stashed a getaway car two blocks from Dealey Plaza. Maybe it was just a coincidence that Carlos despised the Kennedy brothers more than any other two human beings on earth. Jack and Bobby had dragged Carlos in front of the Senate and pissed on his leg in front of the whole country. A couple of years after that, they’d tried to deport him to Guatemala.

“Maybe Carlos had forgiven and forgotten. Sure. And maybe some mope who lugged boxes of books around a warehouse for a living could make a rifle shot like that—six floors up, a moving target, a breeze, trees in the way.”

When Carlos starts getting rid of loose ends, Guidry realizes that he’s probably next in line to be disposed of, so he hits the road, hoping to reconnect with a powerful pal in Las Vegas who holds a grudge against Carlos. Perhaps his friend might be willing to smuggle Guidry out of the country. But first, he needs to get there, knowing that Carlos’s man is hot on his trail.

Then Guidry stumbles upon the perfect cover—no one will be looking for a family man. Enter Charlotte, a small-town Oklahoma housewife. She is on the run from her alcoholic husband with her two daughters and their epileptic dog in tow, making her way to Los Angeles with plans to start her life over. When her car breaks down in New Mexico, and she and Guidry wind up at the same motel, he sees his chance to win her trust and offer her a ride. So Frank Guidry becomes Frank Wainwright, insurance salesman: “If Guidry could pull this off, he’d be practically invisible.”

My main beef with books about mobsters is that they tend to have high body counts, and ruthless, remorseless killers are not generally people I enjoy reading about. However, Berney (whose last book, The Long and Faraway Gone, was one of my favorites of 2015) is such a gifted writer that he is able to bring a lot of depth to Frank Guidry. His journey with Charlotte and the girls changes him in some very significant ways. And Charlotte’s story takes some unpredictable turns as well, as Guidry comes to realize that he has feelings for this woman who was unwittingly dragged into his dangerous road trip. By the end, I found myself caring about and sympathizing with both characters.

* I had the chance to meet Lou Berney at a book signing a few days after this was published, and it turns out Carlos Marcello was not only real, he has a fascinating back story, and yes, he really hated the Kennedys. But of course we’ll never really know if he was the one who ordered the hit on JFK. According to Berney, Marcello’s motto was, “Three can keep a secret if two of them are dead.”

“Mr. Nice Guy” by Jennifer Miller & Jason Feifer

Mr. Nice GuyLooking back, I often wish I had moved to New York when I was younger. I suspect the city would have chewed me up and spat me out, but at least I would have been young and dumb enough to try. So I could immediately relate to Lucas Callahan, a mid-20s native of North Carolina who breaks up with his fiancée and drops out of law school in order to chase his NYC dreams.

Lucas winds up as a fact-checker at Empire magazine, a New YorkVanity Fair-type publication that is ruled by its capricious and social-climbing editor-in-chief, Jay Jacobson. One fateful night, Lucas stops in at a West Village bar called Kettle of Fish where he spots a stunning woman sitting solo and scribbling notes on a bar napkin. Lucas boldly offers her a sheet of paper, and after a couple of drinks, they head to her apartment.

What seems like a one-night stand with a glamorous older woman turns into something much more when the note-taker, Carmen Kelly, writes an unsparing account of her experience with Lucas—in the pages of Empire magazine. It turns out that Carmen is the mag’s dating and sex columnist (she rarely goes into the office, which is why Lucas hadn’t met her), and her vicious takedown of “Mr. Nice Guy” (her nickname for Lucas) becomes a viral sensation. Lucas decides to respond, and sets up an anonymous email address and fires off a rebuttal. Sensing a way to boost Empire‘s web traffic, Jacobson runs Lucas’s column; it is also a hit.

Jacobson goads Carmen into meeting up with Lucas again, and having them both write about the experience for Empire: “a regular sexual exchange between [Lucas] and Carmen to be followed by columns penned by each, reviewing the other’s performance.” Since Lucas’s identity is still under wraps (he continues to file his stories via the anonymous email account), he can’t get paid for his work, but at least he’s finally a published writer, one seemingly all of New York is reading and talking about.

This is a surprisingly meaty novel which considers questions of ethics in journalism and what you’d be willing to give up in order to achieve your dreams. It’s also got a terrific sense of place; I read this just a couple weeks after I’d visited New York, and it really captured the city beautifully. The only thing I didn’t quite buy was that a power-mad control freak like Jacobson would allow “Mr. Nice Guy” to remain anonymous—surely he’d have an underling follow Carmen around until he’d sussed out her partner’s identity? But on the whole, I thoroughly enjoyed this very modern romantic comedy.

Mr. Nice Guy will be published on Oct. 16; thanks to St. Martin’s Griffin for the advance copy (via NetGalley).